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Wickham Market Primary School

Opportunity and enrichment for pupils and staff

Science


Curriculum Intent – Science

Aims to ensure that all children:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific skills required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future. We understand that it is important for lessons to have a skills-based focus, and that the knowledge can be taught through this

Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity (National Curriculum 2014). It helps us to understand the world we live in, and beyond! But there is so much more to discover which is why we actively encourage curiosity and instil passion in our scientists here at Wickham Market

Our Philosophy

At Wickham Market Primary School, our science curriculum is designed to inspire enthusiasm for learning, to ensure achievement. Our aims are to ensure that our pupils experience a wide breadth of study and have, by the end of each key stage, long term memory of an ambitious body of knowledge. It provides opportunities for children to develop as independent, confident and successful learners, with high aspirations. Our vision is to create budding, confident scientists, with inquisitive, questioning minds and well developed critical-thinking skills.  We recognise the importance of science in every aspect of daily life.

Through revisiting of threshold concepts pupils return to the same concepts over and over and gradually build an understanding of them. For each of the threshold concepts the three milestones provide a progression model.

Scientific support.

With the support of Ogden Trust the Academy has a dedicated Phiz lab enabling pupils to access higher level scientific learning. Through the use of the Phiz lab and its resources pupils will have opportunity to investigate and explore scientific ideas and concepts. Access to National Ogden Trust scientific expertise will develop pupils scientific thinking and build links within the Phiz lab community.

Whilst in upper KS2 pupils will develop links with High School science concepts and prepare for transition to High School scientific learning. Through links with High School science leaders and deeper science learning pupils will become more confident with the move to High School.

'Hands on science' , pupils extracting DNA from strawberries

Designated science lab for school science lessons

EYFS

In EYFS, much of the science is based on children exploring the world around them, finding out why things happen and how this affects their lives.

This involves guiding children to make sense of their physical world and their community through opportunities to explore, observe and find out about people, places, technology and the environment.

Three characteristics of effective teaching and learning are:

  • Playing and exploring – children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’
  • Active learning – children concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter difficulties, and enjoy achievements
  • Creating and thinking critically – children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things

Key Stage 1

The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos.

‘Working scientifically’ is described separately in the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to the teaching of substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.

Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1.

Lower Key Stage 2

The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out.

‘Working scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.

Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary correctly and with confidence, using their growing word reading and spelling knowledge.

Upper Key Stage 2

The principal focus of science teaching in upper key stage 2 is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. They should do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically. At upper key stage 2, they should encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. They should also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. They should select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Pupils should draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings.

‘Working and thinking scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.

Pupils should read, spell and pronounce scientific vocabulary correctly

KNEX Academy engineering competition winning design year 5/6

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